Ski Doo Outlet

Ski Doo Enthusiasts

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patagoniasnow:

Dream Job Files: Glen Morden - The guy behind the gear at Patagonia
By Greg Fitzsimmons
Hailing from Ancaster, Ontario, Morden’s route to his gig at Patagonia began at HoliMont Ski Resort—a classic “Ski the East,” ski town in western New York. From there, Morden moved west in pursuit of a degree and softer snow, studying Industrial Design at Vancouver’s Emily Carr Institute of Design and spending ski days between Mount Baker and Whistler. Morden’s backstory comes to life in the functionality, usability, and aesthetics of Patagonia’s snowsports line.
Read the story at POWDER Magazine
Photo: Adam Clark

patagoniasnow:

Dream Job Files: Glen Morden - The guy behind the gear at Patagonia

By Greg Fitzsimmons

Hailing from Ancaster, Ontario, Morden’s route to his gig at Patagonia began at HoliMont Ski Resort—a classic “Ski the East,” ski town in western New York. From there, Morden moved west in pursuit of a degree and softer snow, studying Industrial Design at Vancouver’s Emily Carr Institute of Design and spending ski days between Mount Baker and Whistler. Morden’s backstory comes to life in the functionality, usability, and aesthetics of Patagonia’s snowsports line.

Read the story at POWDER Magazine

Photo: Adam Clark

103 notes

futurejournalismproject:

The Magic Behind Google Maps Street View

Six years ago, Google Maps began the street view experiment:

When we first started Street View as an experimental project, we packed several computers into the back of an SUV, stuck cameras, lasers, and a GPS device on top, and drove around collecting our first imagery. Since Street View launched for five U.S. cities in May 2007, we’ve expanded our 360-degree panoramic views to include locations on all seven continents.

We then moved to a van for a brief period, before switching to a fleet of cars that would allow us to scale the project throughout the US and around the world. We went from a rack of computers to one small computer per car, and then set to work refining our camera system to capture higher-resolution panoramic views.

Over the years, they graduated their equipment vehicles from trike to trolley to snowmobile. Now, they’re recruiting trekkers to capture every inaccesible corner of the world with the Street View Backpack.

And you can apply to become a trekker

Images: Selected images from Google Maps Street View - Cars, Trikes and More

There is a Google snowmobile? What a great job!

42,000 notes

bernardin:

A few years back, I went snowmobiling in Maine. It was an organized tour thing: Four days long, led by a backwoods guide who had some very excellent replacement teeth. We rode about 100-125 miles each day and stayed in a different lodge each night; a chase van followed us with our stuff. Picking through the woods, blazing over frozen lakes, twisting up narrow mountain trails — it was a fantastic experience and I didn’t almost kill myself. (That would be the next trip.)
One morning, we set out just before dawn. It had snowed the night before, so the trail was covered in virgin snow. As the sun rose, it hit the snow at such an angle that it sparkled. A blanket of shimmering white for as far as the eye could see.
It didn’t last for long, maybe a few minutes. But for that scant handful of time, I hung back and it was just me and the world.
And the world was showing off.

bernardin:

A few years back, I went snowmobiling in Maine. It was an organized tour thing: Four days long, led by a backwoods guide who had some very excellent replacement teeth. We rode about 100-125 miles each day and stayed in a different lodge each night; a chase van followed us with our stuff. Picking through the woods, blazing over frozen lakes, twisting up narrow mountain trails — it was a fantastic experience and I didn’t almost kill myself. (That would be the next trip.)

One morning, we set out just before dawn. It had snowed the night before, so the trail was covered in virgin snow. As the sun rose, it hit the snow at such an angle that it sparkled. A blanket of shimmering white for as far as the eye could see.

It didn’t last for long, maybe a few minutes. But for that scant handful of time, I hung back and it was just me and the world.

And the world was showing off.